Human Resource Functions Critical To Any Business Operation

A human resource individual can be described as a person who “professionally” oversees the organization’s human resource management functions. This includes a wide spectrum of managing the entire employee-employer relationship, including outside forces that interact, and employment laws applicable to the workplace.

Employees are a businesses’ “most valuable asset!” Whether you have just one employee or many, the success of any business operation lies with its employees. Attracting and retaining employees is critical to any businesses’ operational success. Unfortunately, many business owners unwisely leave human resource functions to individuals who are not qualified in the area (e.g. receptionist, office manager, accounting, etc.), because the individual lacks the proper education, experience, or otherwise, which leaves the business operation vulnerable to employee litigation, increased turnover, and unhappy employees. Business operators should use a qualified individual to manage key internal human resource functions. There are three (3) key areas of human resource management which can be summed up into the following categories:

  • Employee Recruitment and Retention: includes by way of example, but not limitation creating organizational roles, interviewing, job descriptions, selection and placement, assessments, and background screening
  • Employee Retention and Engagement: includes by way of example, but not limitation on boarding of new employees, training and development, compensation and benefits, career and/or succession planning, performance management, and employee related issues
  • HR Policies, Procedures, and Law Compliance: includes by way of example, but not limitation, HR strategy, HR tools, HR policies (e.g. employee manuals and forms), compliance with local, state, or federal employment laws, HR training, education, and certifications.

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Social Security Disability Appeal Representation-Michigan

Have you been denied social security disability benefits?

According to the Social Security Administration, some of the top reasons individuals are denied social security disability benefits upon application are as follows:

  • You have not had the disability long enough or it isn’t severe enough
  • Refusal to cooperate with Social Security, such as getting an independent medical exam
  • You don’t have up to date medical records or you have insufficient medical documentation
  • You don’t follow through with the appeal process after being denied at the application level
  • Even though you might have a physical or mental impairment, Social Security claims you can still work in your usual type of work or another type of work
  • The impairment resulted from an alcohol/drug addiction or conviction which may make you ineligible
  • You failed to follow a prescribed treatment
  • You returned to substantial work before the disability can be established

Social Security Disability statistics show that only 30-40% of individuals are successful at getting social security disability at the application phase. The approval rate increases approximately an additional 10% on claims that were denied but were submitted for reconsideration. However, social security disability claims approval (those denied after application or reconsideration of a denial) jumps dramatically at the administrative hearing level where the success rate, depending on the jurisdiction you are in, climbs to 50-60% overall. Our firm represents individuals in Michigan who have been denied social security benefits and have a pending hearing or are waiting for a hearing date to be provided before an administrative law judge. We only get paid if we WIN your social security disability claim appeal..

Restrictive Covenant Agreements-“Buyer Beware!”

Restrictive Covenant Agreements

 

            Restrictive covenant agreements are a useful tool for any business wanting to protect their interests and assets with current and past employees.  These types of agreements commonly involve matters concerning trade secrets, non-disclosure, non-solicitation, confidentiality, and non-competition clauses. Some of these types of agreements are stand alone or are a part of an employment contract or severance package. So long as reasonable, Michigan law allows for non-compete agreements in employment (See Michigan Antitrust Reform Act, MCL 445.774a). In general, restrictive covenant agreements attempt to restrict employees who are currently employed and after a separation of employment from doing something or not doing something that they otherwise may have had a legal right to do. The most common practice of employers is to provide a restrictive covenant agreement at the time of the offer of employment or hire, but, under current Michigan case law, employers can require employees to sign a restrictive covenant agreement after the employee has already been hired. Far too often, employees are too eager to take an offer of employment and/or want to continue their employment with a business and, unfortunately, employees do not spend enough time reviewing these restrictive covenant agreements, and, it’s not until they separate their employment with a business do they realize the quagmire they might be in, especially in cases involving non-competes. Before signing any of these types of agreements, individuals should seek legal counsel for advice.  .

Federal Trademarks: Protecting Your Business Name, Logo, Products or Services

A trademark is a brand name.  A trademark or service mark includes any word, name, symbol, device, or any combination, used or intended to be used to identify and distinguish the goods/services of one seller or provider from those of others, and to indicate the source of the goods/services.  Although federal registration of a mark is not mandatory, it has several advantages, including notice to the public of the registrant’s claim of ownership of the mark, legal presumption of ownership nationwide, and exclusive right to use the mark on or in connection with the goods/services listed in the registration. Federally registered trademarks are national in scope, regardless of the actual geographic use made by the mark.

Advantages To Having a Federally Registered Trademark

Additional substantive benefits received through federal registration include, but are not limited to:

  • The ability to recover profits, damages and costs for infringement, including the possibility of receiving treble damages in certain circumstances;
  • The ability to recover attorneys’ fees in infringement actions;
  • The right to use the ® symbol in connection with the mark, which may deter potential infringers;
  • Federal registration also makes it easier to prove an allegation of trademark infringement by providing prima facie evidence of trademark ownership and use.

The law firm of Seth T. Seidell provides federal trademark legal services at reasonable and affordable fixed rates.

Source:            www.uspto.gov.